Roman Empire Ancient

Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality

Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality
Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality
Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality
Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality

Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality   Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality

Obv: AK KL TAKITOC CEB. Laureate bust of Emperor Tacitus right.

Dikaiosyne standing left holding scales and cornucopiae. Please, check out other ancient coins we have available for sale. We are offering 1000+ ancient coins collection.

ALL COINS ARE GENUINE LIFETIME GUARANTEE. The attribution label is printed on archival museum quality paper. An interesting scarce museum quality Alexandrian tetradrachm of Tacitus. Bust of Emperor Tacitus on obverse and Dikaiosyne on reverse. This coin comes with a free display case, easel and attribution label attached.

A great way to display an ancient coins collection. Only within the continental U. The origins of Marcus Claudius Tacitus are disputed.

In fact not much is known about him at all. The ancient literary sources, making him a fabulously rich Italian, appear to be fiction rather than fact. One assumes he was born somewhere in the Danube region.

The year of his birth being most likely around AD 200. This derives from the statement that Tacitus was 75 years old on his accession, though this too might be incorrect. Most likely he was an old military general, having risen through the ranks to wealth and status, and having finally held the consulship in AD 273. At the death of Aurelian he was not with the emperor and his army in Thrace, but staying at his house at Baiae in Campania, perhaps having retired from service.

How the choice for emperor fell on Tacitus is unknown. There is some suggestion that the army indeed left it to the senate to choose the emperor after the death of Aurelian, but this indeed seems highly doubtful.

Why the army's men didn't elect anyone among those leaders who were at the time with Aurelian's campaign force in Thrace is not know. Instead they chose a man hundreds of miles away, residing at his country house. It is very probable that the army's leaders simply couldn't agree on anyone among themselves. And so they simply chose Tacitus as he was deemed a safe pair of hands. Once Tacitus learnt of his elevation to the throne he left for Rome, to accept the senate's confirmation of position in person. Also he saw to it that Aurelian was deified. With Tacitus taking power there was the promise of dynastic rule and the stability which accompanies it. For he had several which might have succeeded him. Tacitus' desire include his family in influential positions also showed, when he made his half-brother, Florian, praetorian prefect.

For all its promise, the reign might have been a very tranquil one, would it not have been for another wave of Germanic invasions. The Franks, the Alemanni, and a tribe called the Longiones (lugii) crashed into Gaul and the Goths and the Heruli once more crossed the Black Sea to wreak havoc on Asia Minor (Turkey). Tacitus decided the Gothic invasion was the more urgent matter. Also Aurelian's army appeared still to be in Thrace.

Accompanied by Florian he led the legions into Asia Minor and defeated the barbarians in battle in spring of AD 276. There are two versions of events surrounding Tacitus' death at Tyana in Cappadocia shortly after his victory over the barbarians. One version tells of the very same murderers who had just shortly before assassinated his relative, the governor of Syria called Maximinus, then journeyed from Syria to kill Tacitus.

Another account says that Tacitus simply died of illness. In any case, Tacitus died in July AD 276, having ruled for only six months. If you have a problem with your item please refrain from leaving negative or neutral feedback until you have made contact and given a fair chance to rectify the situation. As always, every effort is made to ensure that your shopping experience meets or exceeds your expectations. This item is in the category "Coins & Paper Money\Coins: Ancient\Roman: Imperial (27 BC-476 AD)".

The seller is "timelessthing" and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped to United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Denmark, Romania, Slovakia, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Malta, Estonia, Australia, Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, Slovenia, Japan, China, Sweden, Korea, South, Indonesia, Taiwan, South Africa, Thailand, Belgium, France, Hong Kong, Ireland, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Italy, Germany, Austria, Bahamas, Israel, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Singapore, Switzerland, Norway, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Kuwait, Bahrain, Croatia, Republic of, Malaysia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Belize, Dominica, Grenada, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Montserrat, Turks and Caicos Islands, Barbados, Bangladesh, Bermuda, Brunei Darussalam, Bolivia, Ecuador, Egypt, French Guiana, Guernsey, Gibraltar, Guadeloupe, Iceland, Jersey, Jordan, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Liechtenstein, Sri Lanka, Luxembourg, Monaco, Macau, Martinique, Maldives, Nicaragua, Oman, Peru, Pakistan, Paraguay, Reunion, Vietnam, Uruguay.

  • Composition: Bronze
  • Ruler: Tacitus
  • Denomination: Ancient coin
  • Year: Ancient coin
  • Era: Ancient
  • Grade: Ungraded
  • Cleaned/Uncleaned: Cleaned


Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality   Ancient Roman Empire Coin TACITUS Alexandria Tetradrachm Museum Quality